Haiti kids

33 Powerful Images Of The Largest Slums In The World

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Slums are powerful and moving, and there is an evident contrasting beauty surrounding them. On the one hand there’s astronomical crime levels, high pollution and extreme poverty and on the other come some of the most inspiring success stories, deriving from the families and communities that are filled with such happiness and joy, despite the fact they may not have much.

Ultimately, regardless of the mystery and apparent 5 minute ‘beauty’ of slums for us tourists, there are important questions that need to be asked and here are 33 moving images of the largest slums in the world that will force you to ask some of those hard questions:

“Those that look like they have nothing

usually have what those that have everything don’t!”

                                          – ☻☺flickr – Photographer of “The happy faces of Dharavi”

Kibera slum, Nairobi – Kenya

Kibera is the largest slum in Nairobi, the largest urban slum in Africa and one of the biggest in the world. It is home to almost 1 Million people.
Two young girls carry water on the train tracks that run through the Kibera Slum. Photo by Colin Crowly.

Two young girls carry water on the train tracks that run through the Kibera Slum. Photo by Colin Crowly.

Kids laugh with joy on the train tracks in Kibera slum. Photo by Steffan Jensen.

Kids laugh with joy on the train tracks in Kibera slum. Photo by Steffan Jensen.

Kibera, Nairobi

With up to one million residents, Kibera is Africa’s largest slum. Photo by Trocaire.

Kibera rooftops

Kibera is overcrowded and hygiene levels are extremely low. Photo by Taringa.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Kenya

Dharavi slum, Mumbai – India

Dharavi slum is the largest slum in Asia and is home to over 1 million inhabitants.
Injured boy looks on helplessly as he walks bare-foot through Dharavi's growing litter piles. Photo by Meena Kadri.

Injured boy looks on helplessly as he walks bare-foot through Dharavi’s growing litter piles. Photo by Meena Kadri.

Dharavi slum, India

Dharavi has severe problems with pollution and sanitation. Photo by Thomas Leuthard.

Happy Indian women

The happy faces of Dharavi. Photo by ☻☺flickr.

Boy in Dharavi slum, Mumbai

Happy boy washes himself in Dharavi slum, Mumbai. Photo by Thomas Leuthard.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in India

Favelas of Rio de Janeiro – Brazil

Slums in Brazil are called favelas and it is in these vast networks of hillside favelas where many of Brazil’s footballing stars are born. Football has, for a long time, been the key to building communities and happiness in Brazil.
Rocinha favela Rio

Rocinha is the largest hill favela in Rio de Janeiro and arguably the most famous, being a widely photographed area. Photo by Wikipedia.

The unique tiered layers of the favelas are an impressive sight. Photo by Alex.

The unique tiered layers of the favelas are an impressive sight. Photo by Alex.

Football in Brazil

Football brings so much joy among the communities of Brazil. Photo by Whoateallthepies.com.

football pitch in Rio

As the slums are getting more and more money and help for better infrastructure many kids dreams of having real football pitches are coming true. Photo by Whoateallthepies.com.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Brazil

Cite Soleil, Port-Au-Prince – Haiti

After the devastating 2010 earthquake conditions in many of Haiti’s slums got worse.
Port-au-prince Haiti

The city was reduced to rubble after the catastrophic earthquake that hit in 2010. Photo by Colin Crowley.

Haiti

American troops were deployed to help clean up the city. Photo by The U.S. Army.

joy in Haiti

Troops arrived two weeks too late but see what joy a bit of help can bring? Photo by The U.S. Army.

Haiti kids

Children playing in Port au Prince’s most impoverished district Cite Soliel. Cite Soleil is one of the largest slums in the Northern Hemisphere, home to around 200,000 people. Photo by Crossroads Foundation.

Cite Soleil, Haiti

Happy girls at an orphanage in Haiti, 2012. Photo by FMSC.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Haiti

Khayelitsha, Cape Town – South Africa

South Africa’s largest slum deals with extreme poverty, high crime rates and even higher unemployment rates.
Khayelitsha, South Africa

The slum is made predominantly of corrugated iron and there is little in the way of sanitation. Photo by Valentina Buj.

Khayelitsha slum, South Africa

Football and music pave the way for united communities and a brighter future. Photo by Dplanet.

South Africa kid

Happy kid, Khayelitsha slum, South Africa. Photo by Michiel Van Balen.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in South Africa

Jakarta – Indonesia

Whilst slums may be photogenic and “picturesque” to the photographer or tourist, people are living in extreme poverty and the health issues are astronomical.
Many slums in Jakarta are next to or close to water, causing many polluted rivers. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Many slums in Jakarta are next to or close to water, causing many polluted rivers. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Jakarta slumlife

This happy boy is good reason for the rest of us never to complain again. photo by Wikimedia Commons.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Indonesia

Neza Chalco Itza, Mexico City – Mexico

Containing an epic 4 million inhabitants, Neza Chalco Itza is the world’s largest slum and has the highest crime rate in the state of Mexico.
Neza Chalco Itza

Neza Chalco Itza slum, Mexico City.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Mexico

Lagos – Nigeria

Lagos has struggled with the fierce militant Boko Haram and the slums are just getting worse.
Lagos slums

What may seem like a happy fishing community is actually a neglected, poor community with monumentally high corruption levels. Photo by Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung.

Lagos roadside slum

A Lagos slum looking incredibly neglected beside a motorway. Photo by Taringa.

Lagos, Nigeria

The shantytowns in Lagos are heavily concentrated and highly polluted. Photo by Tamira.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Nigeria

Slums of Manila – Philippines

In one of Asia’s fastest growing economies many people are still people left behind in abject poverty.
Manila, Philippines

The gap is growing rapidly between the rich and the poor in The Philippines. Photo by Taringa.

Manila slum Philippines

Pollution levels are at a disturbing high in the slums of Manila. Photo by Taringa.

Manila street kids

Boys enjoy a basketball match in the streets of Manila. Photo by Marcin Gabruk.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in the Philippines

Caracas – Venezuela

Caracas has one of the highest crime and homicide rates in the world and it’s in the interminable slums where the danger is fueled.
Hillside slum colours Venezuela

These hillside colours may look exciting and attractive but to many that live there, it’s simply a hell-hole. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Caracas, Venezuela

The barrios of Venezuela contain an overwhelming myriad of alleyways and staircases, making it impossible to catch the criminals. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Barrios of Caracas

The unconventional houses of Caracas are scattered in even the most unlikely of places. Photo by Taringa.

>>>Click here for a list of charities in Venezuela

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What are your thoughts on tourism in slums? Comment below…

Comments

  1. Big_M says:

    It’s not fair..What do you mean by tourism in slums? To organize guided tours? Well, it could benefit the local slum community, it they are paid for the excursions, but, just imagine, there are will be too much locals desiring to earn money that way, than the demand of it. As a consequence, bloody rivalry and even worse relations withing slum community. So, it should be very well-planned. But a single tourist can’t help everyone, unfortunately, and he/she will feel sick because of it

  2. GOD. this is terrible we are just seated down comfortable and the others are suffering so it really is a pity i pray that maybe just maybe we as the world will be able to do something the red cross and the other organizations help central areas
    God BLESS you GOD BLESS THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

  3. Ona says:

    Overpopulation …..the less you have the more you breed ….

  4. The problems of slums are alleviated by charity, but not eliminated. In fact, charities might even make the poverty last longer. The issue is not the lack of funding for infrastructure directly. It’s not so much a financial issue as it is a political one.
    Slums could be eliminated without increasing the relative cost of living with a land value tax.
    I wrote an article about this here for earthsharing, but it hasn’t been posted yet.

  5. Keli says:

    Tours of slums? I was astounded that that would even be associated/suggested in conjunction with these photos, let alone contemplated or proposed by anyone. These are people, not zoo animals. It is demeaning and reprehensible to even consider, let alone do. Shame on anyone who thinks this is even remotely ok. How about this: take a week away from your pretty, safe, sanitary home in the U.S. and live with one of these families. Experience what they struggle with and try to help in any way possible. Sure, you can spend a few hours observing such abject poverty but God forbid that you might actually have to experience it. Don’t judge someone until you have walked in their shoes. Those people whom you want to observe from your air-conditioned, bathroom containing bus which most likely serves food would probably love to walk in your shoes for a week. What a gift to them that would be. The whole notion of touring slums instead of trying to help in any way possible disgusts me.

  6. Keli says:

    One more comment: I saw that the following is one of the featured quotes in this article:

    “Those that look like they have nothing
    usually have what those that have everything don’t!”
    – ☻☺flickr – Photographer of “The happy faces of Dharavi”

    Yep, that is accurate. They have diseases that could easily be cured by modern and obtainable healthcare. They have unwanted children due to a lack of contraceptives. They have abusive and traumatic situations because there is no legal system to rely upon for support. They have hunger. They have a day-to-day existence in regards to money and food. They have harsh living in extreme weather conditions. So yep – they have what we don’t! Keep patting yourself on the back about their supposed “simple yet poignantly poetic existence” as you choose a tour that could basically be called rubbernecking. It Is just self serving grandiose bullshit meant to cover even the smallest frisson of guilt that their situations could possibly cause should you choose to participate in such a tour. Last thing: how would you feel if wealthy Americans paid to tour your community to see how the 99% live? Violated. Shamed. Disgusted. Like animals in a zoo only we would understand why we were being viewed whereas the animals don’t. Please reject this notion. It is simple human decency.

  7. fdt says:

    i feel really bad :(

Trackbacks

  1. […] jsou fotografie, které vystihují život v největších slumech na světě: Dharavi (Mumbai), Kibera (Nairobi), Orangi Town […]

  2. Wayward.ly says:

    […] Photographer of “The happy faces of Dharavi” […]

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